Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Poets United Midweek Motif ~ Meteor Showers

Fireball from the 1998 Leonid meteor shower on Nov. 17,
Photo by astrophotographer Lorenzo Lovato, 1998. (SPACE.com)


"The night is falling down around us. Meteors rain like fireworks, quick rips in the seam of the dark.... Every second, another streak of silver glows: parentheses, exclamation points, commas—a whole grammar made of light, 
for words too hard to speak.” 
― Jodi PicoultMy Sister's Keeper

I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me                     

in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.” 
― Jack London

“Better was it to go unknown and leave behind you an arch, then to burn like a meteor and leave no dust.” 
-- Virginia Woolf



The November Meteors by Étienne Léopold Trouvelot, 1868


Midweek Motif ~ Meteor Showers


According to Wikipedia: 
meteor shower is a celestial event in which a number of meteors are observed to radiate, or originate, from one point in the night sky.  . . .   The first great storm in the modern era was the Leonids of November 1833. One estimate is over one hundred thousand meteors an hour,[3] but another, done as the storm abated, estimated in excess of two hundred thousand meteors during the 9 hours of storm[4] over the entire region of North America east of the Rocky Mountains.  
Imagine that!
or have you actually seen them?  

(In November, because the single point of origin is 
in the constellation Leo, they are called the Leonids.)  


Your Challenge:  Employ a meteor shower or a meteor in your new poem, whether historical, fantastical or metaphorical.  



Here are all the details you need for 

2017’s Leonid meteor shower, 
November 17 and 18.

The Meteorite


Among the hills a meteorite
Lies huge; and moss has overgrown,
And wind and rain with touches light
Made soft, the contours of the stone.


Thus easily can Earth digest
A cinder of sidereal fire,
And make her translunary guest
The native of an English shire.


Nor is it strange these wanderers
Find in her lap their fitting place,
For every particle that's hers
Came at the first from outer space.


All that is Earth has once been sky;
Down from the sun of old she came,
Or from some star that travelled by
Too close to his entangling flame.


Hence, if belated drops yet fall
From heaven, on these her plastic power
Still works as once it worked on all
The glad rush of the golden shower.

🌠

In the middle of rolling grasslands, away from lights,
a moonless night untethers its wild polka-dots,
the formations we can name competing for attention
in a twinkling and crowded sky-bowl.

Out from the corners, our eyes detect a maverick meteor,
a transient streak, and lying back toward midnight
on the heft of car hood, all conversation blunted,
we are at once unnerved and somehow restored.
. . . . 
(Read the rest HERE.)

Image result for Meteor Showers Nasa
2003: The Leonid meteor shower

Tyger Tyger, burning bright, 
In the forests of the night; 
What immortal hand or eye, 
Could frame thy fearful symmetry? 

In what distant deeps or skies. 
Burnt the fire of thine eyes? 
On what wings dare he aspire? 
What the hand, dare seize the fire? 

And what shoulder, & what art, 
Could twist the sinews of thy heart? 
And when thy heart began to beat, 
What dread hand? & what dread feet? 

What the hammer? what the chain, 
In what furnace was thy brain? 
What the anvil? what dread grasp, 
Dare its deadly terrors clasp! 

When the stars threw down their spears 
And water'd heaven with their tears: 
Did he smile his work to see? 
Did he who made the Lamb make thee? 

Tyger Tyger burning bright, 
In the forests of the night: 
What immortal hand or eye, 
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?
🌠

Please share your new poem using Mr. Linky below and visit others in the spirit of the community.

(Next week Sumana’s Midweek Motif will be ~ The Flower: Rose)


26 comments:

  1. A bit behind on the prompt topics but thank you for another week of scribbles

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    1. I've been missing you! Good to see you.

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  2. Interesting topic, look forward to the poems!
    Be well, everyone.

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    1. Thank you, Nicholas. We have quite a range today.

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  3. A lovely one, Susan. Happy Wednesday everyone :)

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  4. Late again, I am. Sigh. But I'm ready to be delighted, coffee in hand and coming to visit you before tutoring at 10. And then I will be home again at noon. It's a lovely day in Philadelphia, USA. I hope you have a fine day, too!

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  5. Good Wednesday everyone. Thanks for an intriguing prompt and poem samples Susan

    much love...

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    1. Thank you, Gillena. Glad you enjoyed them. I've been expecting someone to argue against the Blake on, but when you think about it . . .

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  6. Good morning, everyone. I am heading out for a walk into the village and will ponder this topic on the way. Back soon with, hopefully, a poem. Will make the rounds then.

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  7. Hi Susan and cheers for the inspiration. I am not sure if my offering is what was asked for, but it what came to mind. Why - I don't know.
    Anna :o]

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  8. Love the Jodi p poem! Vikings like meaty oars! Happy poeming, everyone!

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    1. Did you read the novel? It got me hooked on her writing.

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  9. I never get to see them! It's always too cloudy. Maybe this year!

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    1. It's supposed to rain here Friday pm. I've only seen Meteors in poetry and pictures. Someday.

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  10. Susan,

    I am absolutely relieved to have finally been able to post my poem. Dreadful computer issues precluded all my attempts earlier today.
    A wonderful subject for this week's prompt! Eileen

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    1. Thank you so much! I still haven't seen a meteor shower, but I can imagine it.

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  11. I thought I would seek light and this was a perfect spot to find it.

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    1. Why thanks, Susie. It's a delight to see you here and read your poetic response to Midweek Motif.

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  12. Good Evening, Poets! Susan, thank you for a great prompt!

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  13. Finally!!!! Nice prompt, Susan.

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    1. P.S. I will be around to respond tomorrow....these have been busy days.

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    2. So good to see you, Mary! Take your time.

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